Yep, 5 Seconds of Summer is moving along

On their new album, the Australian band makes impressive songwriting strides with sonic storytelling and drum fills

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With their crunchy guitars, gang vocals, skinny jeans, and just-naughty-enough lyrics, 5 Seconds of Summer (or 5SOS for short) peaked at #24 on the Hot 100 charts back in 2014 with their breakout single, “She Looks So Perfect.” The four Australian teens had gained mainstream attention after establishing an internet presence with YouTube covers and then being invited to open for One Direction on their international Take Me Home tour in 2013. However, while amassing an army of teen pop fans, the band also garnered attention within the alternative scene.  Continue reading “Yep, 5 Seconds of Summer is moving along”

All Time Low’s “Dirty Laundry”

The new single is emotional, experimental, and ultimately triumphant

Featured image taken from All Time Low’s “Dirty Laundry” video. Fueled By Ramen (c) 2017.

On Friday, All Time Low released their first single since Future Hearts, and it definitely signals a new direction for the band. It has been ten years since the release of their debut album So Wrong, It’s Right, which featured scene staple “Dear Maria, Count Me In,” and a lot has changed; after originally signing to Hopeless Records, switching to Interscope for Dirty Work in 2011, and returning to Hopeless, they have now moved to Fueled By Ramen. The single “Dirty Laundry” is indicative of this change, but its experimental yet emotional nature indicates that this is a positive and exciting new direction. Continue reading “All Time Low’s “Dirty Laundry””

Jon Bellion’s The Human Condition

A modern pop masterpiece that is strikingly honest

Jon Bellion’s The Human Condition, released on June 10 from Capitol Records, is a vibrant and colorful pop record that is disarming in how brutally honest it is. Bellion offers commentary on individualism as defined by consumerism, acknowledges his struggle to unquestionably trust in God, and continuously reflects on his loneliness, success, and self-worth. He paints vivid images with his clever and sometimes unsettling lyricism, but all of this is presented through ridiculously catchy pop songs. Yet it must be noted that this album sounds nothing like the current pop landscape; Bellion is a master of space, and his music leans more towards pop-rock than EDM. Overall, this was one of my favorite albums of 2016, and the texture and emotion behind the music demonstrates that Bellion is a refreshing tour de force to be taken seriously.  Continue reading “Jon Bellion’s The Human Condition”